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Jean-Pascal Flavien & Mika Tajima

Jean-Pascal Flavien & Mika Tajima

Art Asia Pacific

December 2016

A life-size hot tub in luscious shades of gradient orange and purple installed vertically on a gallery wall took center stage at Kayne Griffin Corcoran's two-person show featuring New York-based Mika Tajima and Berlin-based Jean-Pascal Flavien.

Jean-Pascal Flavien & Mika Tajima

Jean-Pascal Flavien & Mika Tajima

Contemporary Art Daily

October 28, 2016

Kayne Griffin Corcoran is pleased to announce a two-person exhibition with Jean-Pascal Flavien and Mika Tajima. While making very different work, both artists investigate social relationships to built environments and attempt to expose the constructed nature of these designed systems. The artists postulate in various forms such as architectural interventions or deconstructions of design objects, all in relation to the human subject.

Jean-Pascal Flavien & Mika Tajima at Kayne Griffin Corcoran

Jean-Pascal Flavien & Mika Tajima at Kayne Griffin Corcoran

Contemporary Art Review Los Angeles

Fall 2016

It seems fitting that Los Angeles born Mika Tajima’s first show in her hometown includes one of her candy-colored Jacuzzi paintings. What could be more quintessentially L.A. than a sunset-ombré hot tub,
 its slick sexy object-ness epitomizing the glamor of Hollywood. Her co-exhibitor Jean-Pascal Flavien likewise embraces the city’s marquee industry with statement house (temporary title) Los Angeles (2016), a diminutive baby pink house—sited in the gallery’s lush courtyard—to be occupied intermittently by two screenwriters over the run of the show.

Mika Tajima: At Kayne Griffin Corcoran, artists place the architecture of art in the frame

Mika Tajima: At Kayne Griffin Corcoran, artists place the architecture of art in the frame

Wallpaper*

Septermber 26, 2016

There is an inherent dialogue in the pairing of Jean-Pascal Flavien and Mika Tajima at Los Angeles gallery Kayne Griffin Corcoran, one that explores how our physical environments probe our emotional and social states, and vice versa. It is easy to think of architecture as fixed and permanent, but their works prove that the spaces we inhabit can be flexible and can afford their human participants a surprising amount of agency.