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Review: Why artist Anthony Hernandez takes his ‘Screened Pictures’ through bus-stop screens

Review: Why artist Anthony Hernandez takes his ‘Screened Pictures’ through bus-stop screens

Los Angeles Times

July 31, 2019

Anthony Hernandez’s “Screened Pictures” exhibition at Kayne Griffin Corcoran gallery suggests that photographs do not so much capture reality as they make physical the distance between camera and subject. Paradoxical as that may seem, this leaves viewers front and center: drawing us into dramas and making us wonder what we’re missing.

Q&A:  Anthony Hernandez’s L.A. photos are shown all over the world. L.A. museums need to catch up

Q&A: Anthony Hernandez’s L.A. photos are shown all over the world. L.A. museums need to catch up

Los Angeles Times

July 25, 2019

For five decades, Anthony Hernandez, who was born and raised on L.A.'s Eastside — first in Boyle Heights, then East Los Angeles — has quietly chronicled the city’s rougher edges. His earliest experiments were with street photography, capturing Angelenos caught in private worlds as they moved around the city.

Public Access

Public Access

Art in America

June 1, 2019

The photographer Anthony Hernandez tends to measure his work almost exclusively in formal phases. It is not unusual for photographers to accentuate the application of their craft rather than to what it is applied, especially for those who came of age at a time when the artistic legitimacy of photography was still questioned. But in Hernandez’s case, given the immediacy and importance of his pictures’ content, the emphasis on form is surprising. Over five decades, in ways both oblique and pointed, Hernandez has documented the breakdown of the social safety net, the brutal follies of contemporary urban planning, and the adulteration of the natural environment. His career, which seems only more apposite today, has been dedicated to investigating a long arc of inequity. Or perhaps it is one measured more by the way he has investigated it. Or both.

Can’t Make It to the Venice Biennale? See Work by Every Artist in the Arsenale Section of the Sprawling Exhibition

Can’t Make It to the Venice Biennale? See Work by Every Artist in the Arsenale Section of the Sprawling Exhibition

Artnet News

May 9, 2019

A little bit of fatigue is part of the price of admission to big, sprawling art events like the Venice Biennale. Navigating such an ambitious exhibition is no easy task, since it ranges across multiple venues and brings together vast quantities of material.

Ralph Rugoff’s edition is plenty ambitious and plenty sprawling. But in an attempt to make the 2019 edition a bit more user-friendly, he has conceptually split the big show into two parts, with each of his selected artists getting to show twice: once in the industrial Arsenale space, and again in the main pavilion in the Giardini. Rugoff has dubbed the two parallel and contrasting exhibitions “Proposition A” and “Proposition B.”

Kayne Griffin Corcoran Now Represents Anthony Hernandez

Kayne Griffin Corcoran Now Represents Anthony Hernandez

ArtNews

April 16, 2019

Artist Anthony Hernandez has joined the roster of Kayne Griffin Corcoran gallery in Los Angeles, where he will have a solo show in July. The gallery will also present works by the artist at Frieze New York in May.

Hernandez, who is also represented by Galerie Thomas Zander in Cologne, Germany, has photographed Los Angeles and its inhabitants for almost five decades. Underpinning his images of the city’s landscape and architecture are examinations of contemporary social issues. An installation by Hernandez will figure in the 2019 Venice Biennale.

Venice Biennale Names Artists Participating in Fifty-Eighth Edition

Venice Biennale Names Artists Participating in Fifty-Eighth Edition

Artforum

March 7, 2019

The artist list for the Fifty-Eighth Venice Biennale, “May You Live in Interesting Times,” has been released. Curated by Ralph Rugoff, the exhibition, which takes its title from a phrase that has long been mistaken as an ancient Chinese curse, will take place from May 11 to November 24, 2019. Artists include Anthony Hernandez.

Anthony Hernandez: 45 years on show in Madrid

Anthony Hernandez: 45 years on show in Madrid

British Journal of Photography

January 8, 2019

“People always ask me why I stopped photographing people,” says Anthony Hernandez, who in the mid-1980s, moved away from the black-and-white street photographs that had made his name. He was 17 years into his career and an artist in residence at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, when he made the shift; initially thinking to photograph the infamous strip, he ended up travelling into the desert and making pictures of the left-over target shooter debris for what was to become a pivotal project, Shooting Sites.

Anthony Hernandez

Anthony Hernandez

Aperture

Fall 2018

There are truthful stereotypes embodied in Los Angeles. Two are particularly instructive for looking at Anthony Hernandez’s recent photographs: The first is how your social position in this vast metropolis is defined by mobility, through your movement through the sprawl. The second is that this is truly a city driven by images.

Anthony Hernandez: Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announces new fellows — and pays tribute to grantees from California

Anthony Hernandez: Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announces new fellows — and pays tribute to grantees from California

Los Angeles Times

April 5, 2018

The Los Angeles photographer, known for his unblinking images of the Southern California landscape, is one of several dozen artists, scholars, writers and scientists across the United States to receive 2018 Guggenheim Fellowships — the complete list of which is expected to be released Thursday morning. “It’s terrific,” says Hernandez. “[Photographer Edward] Weston was my first hero, and he got one of the first ones. A lot of my friends have gotten them. And I finally got one.” He’ll use the grant on a series of works in which he shoots images of Los Angeles and other locales through a screen that renders ordinary corners of the urban landscape as abstracted fields of dots. “They’re very ambiguous,” he says of the new work. “You’re not quite sure what they’re made of or what you are looking at.”